E. coli Lawyer Update: 7 Reported Cases Linked to an Unknown E. coli Outbreak.

For more information on the Unknown E. coli Outbreak, to speak to an E. coli Lawyer, or to inquire about an E. coli Lawsuit call, 1-888-335-4901.

E. coli Lawyer Update: 7 Reported Cases Linked to an Unknown E. coli Outbreak. 

A health alert was issued by the King County Health Department in Washington, due to an unknown E. coli outbreak linked to 7 cases of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC). The cases of the E. coli outbreak began to be reported to health department officials on April 22, 2021, with the latest being reported on May 1, 2021. According to health department officials, all seven cases reported thus far have been children under the age of 14, three of which are under the age of 5. Of the seven reported cases, six of them required hospitalization.

An investigation on the STEC outbreak is currently underway by the King County Health Department, along with the Washington State Department of Health to try and discover the source of the illnesses. At this time no food product, restaurant, or common source has been found between the cases. Health Department officials are urging parents who have children that might be exhibiting symptoms of E. coli such as bloody diarrhea, high fevers, or decreased urine to take them to a medical health care provider as soon as possible. STEC can be very dangerous especially for children; two of the cases linked to the outbreak have developed a severe type of kidney complication known as hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). 

In a recent interview, Health Department Officials from Kings County said “We are also working with the Washington State Department of Health to complete further testing and to help identify possible related cases in other counties.” They have also advised children experiencing symptoms of STEC to refrain from attending daycares or school even if their symptoms are mild. Parents should also take precautions and wash their hands with soap and water before preparing and eating foods for the children.

Symptoms of STEC symptoms manifest after an incubation period of 1 to 10 days; however, in the vast majority of cases, symptoms appear between 3 and 4 days after exposure. The most common symptoms of STEC are high fevers, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea that at times can be bloody, and severe abdominal cramping. Ron Simon, a National E. coli Lawyer, stated:

“Around 5–10% of those who are diagnosed with STEC infection develop a potentially life-threatening complication known as hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS)… The complication occurs more frequently among children with STEC induced diarrhea. Approximately 15% of these children develop HUS.  HUS can lead to acute renal failure in children.”

For more information on the Unknown E. coli Outbreak, to speak to an E. coli Lawyer, or to inquire about an E. coli Lawsuit call, 1-888-335-4901.

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